A Power to Do Justice: Jurisdiction, English Literature, and the Rise of Common Law (Paperback)
  • A Power to Do Justice: Jurisdiction, English Literature, and the Rise of Common Law (Paperback)
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A Power to Do Justice: Jurisdiction, English Literature, and the Rise of Common Law (Paperback)

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£24.00
Paperback 424 Pages / Published: 30/07/2013
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English law underwent rapid transformation in the sixteenth century in response to the Reformation and the growing power of the legal profession. In "A Power to Do Justice", Bradin Cormack argues that jurisdictional encounters and crises made visible the law's resemblance to the literary arts, and that Renaissance writers engaged with the concept of jurisdiction to reflect both on the nature of law and on their own imaginative practice. Reassessing the relationship between English literature and law from More to Shakespeare and Webster, Cormack shows that where literary texts attend to jurisdiction, they dramatize how boundaries and limits are the very precondition of law's power.

Publisher: The University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226061542
Number of pages: 424
Weight: 544 g
Dimensions: 229 x 152 x 25 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
"In "A Power to do Justice", Bradin Cormack brilliantly revises our way of thinking about the relationships between literature, law, and 'power' in early modern England. He encourages us to think of law as constituted by jurisdictional boundaries, and shows us how profoundly the poetic fictions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries are engaged in reimagining these boundaries, and all that they make possible. The dialogue between the disciplines isn't just advanced by Cormack's thoughtful and generous book: it is taken to a new level of theoretical and historical understanding."

--Lorna Hutson, Berry Professor of English Literature, University of St. Andrews
"In "A Power to do Justice," Bradin Cormack brilliantly revises our way of thinking about the relationships between literature, law, and 'power' in early modern England. He encourages us to think of law as constituted by jurisdictional boundaries, and shows us how profoundly the poetic fictions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries are engaged in reimagining these boundaries, and all that they make possible. The dialogue between the disciplines isn't just advanced by Cormack's thoughtful and generous book: it is taken to a new level of theoretical and historical understanding."
--Lorna Hutson, Berry Professor of English Literature, University of St. Andrews
There could be no stronger argument for integrating the study of literature and the law than this book. "A Power to Do Justice" is a magisterial accomplishment: for its formidable scholarship, its conceptual sophistication, and its stunning sensitivity to language, both poetic and prescriptive.
--Margreta de Grazia, Sheli Z. and Burton X. Rosenberg Professor of Humanities, Un"
In this learned and legible book, Bradin Cormack shifts our attention from sovereignty and its others, to jurisdiction as the persistently problematic practice of representing and enacting legal authority. He convincingly demonstrates that Elizabethan and Tudor literature was a rich site for working out massively important material shifts in the construction of the legal order. A contribution to critical legal studies to be treasured; a contribution to critical legal history to be emulated; a contribution to our understanding of the relationship between law and literature that to my complete delight transcends the parochial terms in which the two fields of interpretive practice have typically encountered one another.
--Janet Halley, Royall Professor of Law, Harvard Law School"
In "A Power to do Justice," Bradin Cormack brilliantly revises our way of thinking about the relationships between literature, law, and power in early modern England. He encourages us to think of law as constituted by jurisdictional boundaries, and shows us how profoundly the poetic fictions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries are engaged in reimagining these boundaries, and all that they make possible. The dialogue between the disciplines isn t just advanced by Cormack s thoughtful and generous book: it is taken to a new level of theoretical and historical understanding.
--Lorna Hutson, Berry Professor of English Literature, University of St. Andrews"
This is a work of enormous erudition, enviable rigor, and considerable consequence. "A Power to Do Justice" offers a new model of law and literature, and it will act as a humanizing presence within jurisprudence for many years to come.
--Peter Goodrich, Professor of Law, Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University"
"There could be no stronger argument for integrating the study of literature and the law than this book. A Power to Do Justice is a magisterial accomplishment: for its formidable scholarship, its conceptual sophistication, and its stunning sensitivity to language, both poetic and prescriptive."

--Margreta de Grazia, Sheli Z. and Burton X. Rosenberg Professor of Humanities, Un


"In this learned and legible book, Bradin Cormack shifts our attention from sovereignty and its others, to jurisdiction as the persistently problematic practice of representing and enacting legal authority. He convincingly demonstrates that Elizabethan and Tudor literature was a rich site for working out massively important material shifts in the construction of the legal order. A contribution to critical legal studies to be treasured; a contribution to critical legal history to be emulated; a contribution to our understanding of the relationship between law and literature that --to my complete delight--transcends the parochial terms in which the two fields of interpretive practice have typically encountered one another."

--Janet Halley, Royall Professor of Law, Harvard Law School


"In A Power to do Justice, Bradin Cormack brilliantly revises our way of thinking about the relationships between literature, law, and 'power' in early modern England. He encourages us to think of law as constituted by jurisdictional boundaries, and shows us how profoundly the poetic fictions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries are engaged in reimagining these boundaries, and all that they make possible. The dialogue between the disciplines isn't just advanced by Cormack's thoughtful and generous book: it is taken to a new level of theoretical and historical understanding."

--Lorna Hutson, Berry Professor of English Literature, University of St. Andrews


"This is a work of enormous erudition, enviable rigor, and considerable consequence. A Power to Do Justice offers a new model of law and literature, and it will act as a humanizing presence within jurisprudence for many years to come."

--Peter Goodrich, Professor of Law, Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University

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