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A New Path: Undergraduate Libraries at United States and Canadian Universities, 1949-1987 (Hardback)
  • A New Path: Undergraduate Libraries at United States and Canadian Universities, 1949-1987 (Hardback)
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A New Path: Undergraduate Libraries at United States and Canadian Universities, 1949-1987 (Hardback)

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£71.00
Hardback 173 Pages / Published: 27/04/1988
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Roland Person's A New Path is a fine comprehensive study of such libraries based ...on an examination of the perceptions of those involved in their operation, management, and administration. Person does an outstanding job summarizing the history and the literature of undergraduate libraries and of blending all of that material into a skillfully synthesized examination of the undergraduate library in the United States and Canada from 1949 through 1987. Wilson Library Bulletin Because of the work's broad scope, all individuals involved in higher education will find much of value in this new volume. Richard Johnson, SUNY Oneonta This is the first full-length study of university undergraduate libraries to appear since the late 1960s. It is a comprehensive description and evaluation of both the contextual role of present undergraduate libraries and the goals upon which they were founded and continue to operate. Person has provided an exhaustive analysis of the subject by clearly defining undergraduate libraries, identifying the reasons for which they were established, evaluating the assumptions that precipitated their inception, and describing the development of those that failed and those that succeeded.

Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780313253034
Number of pages: 173
Weight: 353 g
Dimensions: 216 x 140 x 11 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
"Roland Person's A New Path is a fine comprehensive study of such libraries based, in part, like Paris's study on an examination of the perceptions of those involved in their operation, management, and administration. Person does an outstanding job summarizing the history and the literature of undergraduate libraries and of blending all of that material into a skillfully synthesized examination of the undergraduate library in the United States and Canada from 1949 through 1987. Person's primary conclusion, which is strikingly similar to Paris's, is that undergraduate libraries as a group have not seen a need to justify their existence in terms of successfully meeting their mission. That suggests, in turn, the kind of lack of leadership identified by Paris although Person does not directly address that issue. The selected bibliography is excellent and reflects the literature from the beginning of the movement to the mid-1980's. The index is very good and is appropriately detailed. The physical preparation of the volume meets Greenwood's high standards of printing and binding. Highly recommended."-International Journal of Reviews
"Roland Conrad Person provides a comprehensive review of the most distinctive phenomenon in twentieth century academic librarianship--the undergraduate library. From his probing Person shows that the undergraduate library was but one response in the post World War II years to the changing needs of students during a time of great change for the univerisities themselves. That some undergraduate libraries have failed, some have changed their missions, and others continue to thrive does not lessen the value of this library for Person. Instead, the situation demonstrates to him that one model for the undergraduate library, the classic example of Harvard's Lamont Library, does not necessarily meet the needs or situations in all institutions. Through his thorough research, Person provides as well a good current supplement and updating of Irene Braden Hoadley's work from 1970, The Undergraduate Library. Because of the work's broad scope, all individuals involved in higher education will find much of value in this new volume."-Richard D. Johnson, Director of Libraries, State University of New York, College at Oneonta
?Roland Conrad Person provides a comprehensive review of the most distinctive phenomenon in twentieth century academic librarianship--the undergraduate library. From his probing Person shows that the undergraduate library was but one response in the post World War II years to the changing needs of students during a time of great change for the univerisities themselves. That some undergraduate libraries have failed, some have changed their missions, and others continue to thrive does not lessen the value of this library for Person. Instead, the situation demonstrates to him that one model for the undergraduate library, the classic example of Harvard's Lamont Library, does not necessarily meet the needs or situations in all institutions. Through his thorough research, Person provides as well a good current supplement and updating of Irene Braden Hoadley's work from 1970, The Undergraduate Library. Because of the work's broad scope, all individuals involved in higher education will find much of value in this new volume.?-Richard D. Johnson, Director of Libraries, State University of New York, College at Oneonta
?Roland Person's A New Path is a fine comprehensive study of such libraries based, in part, like Paris's study on an examination of the perceptions of those involved in their operation, management, and administration. Person does an outstanding job summarizing the history and the literature of undergraduate libraries and of blending all of that material into a skillfully synthesized examination of the undergraduate library in the United States and Canada from 1949 through 1987. Person's primary conclusion, which is strikingly similar to Paris's, is that undergraduate libraries as a group have not seen a need to justify their existence in terms of successfully meeting their mission. That suggests, in turn, the kind of lack of leadership identified by Paris although Person does not directly address that issue. The selected bibliography is excellent and reflects the literature from the beginning of the movement to the mid-1980's. The index is very good and is appropriately detailed. The physical preparation of the volume meets Greenwood's high standards of printing and binding. Highly recommended.?-International Journal of Reviews

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