Ts&Cs
apply

Blog

Bernardine Evaristo Recommends Her Top 5 Reads of 2019

Posted on 6th December 2019 by Mark Skinner

Bernardine Evaristo's thoroughly deserved Booker triumph for Girl, Woman, Other cemented her reputation as one of the finest British authors of her generation. Below, she recommends her favourite black British non-fiction books of 2019, each one adding immeasurably to the vibrant discourse surrounding race, identity and belonging in the twenty-first century.  

It’s astonishing how many black British non-fiction books have been published this year, each one contributing to the conversation about our presence on these here isles. My choices are among the best for anyone who is interested in exploring what it means to be British.

No Win Race by Derek A. Bardowell 

A ground-breaking take on race and sport framed between the Brixton Riots and Brexit. It’s both political and personal, part memoir and part-social commentary, as it unpicks issues around identity that challenge our complacencies.

£16.99
Hardback
In stock
Available
A powerful account of race relations in the UK from the early 1980s to the present day, told through the all-pervasive cultural import of sport. Tracing a path from widespread football terrace racism to the national treasure status afforded the likes of Sir Mo Farah, Bardowell discovers a sporting landscape where racial abuse may be less overt but where success still seldom translates into power.
  • This item has been added to your basket
View basket Checkout

Taking Up Space: The Black Girl’s Manifesto for Change by Chelsea Kwakye and Ore Ogunbiyi

Also a ground-breaking book of interviews, edited by two recent university graduates, about the experiences of women of colour in predominantly white universities. It’s an indictment of the structural racism inherent in our academic institutions, which fail to treat students of colour as equally as other students, and fail to provide inclusive curricula.

£12.99
Hardback
Out of stock
An electrifying and impassioned polemic against the lack of diversity in the education system, Taking Up Space draws on case studies and testimonies from students past and present to challenge the stultifying status quo. A call to arms of the utmost eloquence and sophistication.

This product is currently unavailable.

  • This item has been added to your basket
View basket Checkout

Black, Listed: Black British Culture Explored by Jeffrey Boakye

A surprisingly entertaining lexical romp around race in the UK. He has amassed all kinds of descriptors, contemporary and historical, some of them offensive, many of them simply cultural, and presented them in an accessible dictionary format in order to illuminate what it means to be black and British.

£8.99
Paperback
In stock
Available
A groundbreaking book celebrating the words and phrases that by choice or by circumstance define the Black British experience.
  • This item has been added to your basket
View basket Checkout

Don't Touch My Hair by Emma Dabiri

One might think that black women’s hair is a superficial topic to write about, but far from it. Dabiri’s book is an in-depth exploration of all the historical, cultural, political, philosophical, practical and racial issues around our hair – which is all so much more than the aesthetics of our protein filaments!

£16.99
Hardback
Out of stock
'Groundbreaking . . . a scintillating, intellectual investigation into black women and the very serious business of our hair, as it pertains to race, gender, social codes, tradition, culture, cosmology, maths, politics, philosophy and history' Bernardine Evaristo, The Times Literary Supplement Books of the YearIn this powerful book about why black ...

This product is only available to collect in store.

  • This item has been added to your basket
View basket Checkout

Homecoming: Voices of the Windrush Generation by Colin Grant

Unsurprisingly a BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week this year. It’s a book full of wonderful voices who tell the stories of the Windrush Generation from multiple perspectives, not only from those who travelled to Britain from the Caribbean having cherished the myth of the motherland, but also contemporaneous politicians and proud racists. This book ensures their voices are not lost.

£18.99
Hardback
We can order this from the publisher
Usually dispatched within 10 working days
A treasure trove of testimony from the West Indian men and women of the Windrush generation, Homecoming resounds with voices both of optimism and disillusion, reflecting the complex immigrant experience of the 1950s and 1960s. Expertly constructed and brimming with compassion, Grant’s fine work is a window on a fascinating period of Britain’s recent history.
  • This item has been added to your basket
View basket Checkout


Comments

There are currently no comments.