A. S. Byatt

Booker Prize-winning novelist...

24/08/1936 -

A. S. Byatt biography and information

Dame Antonia Susan Duffy, DBE, also known as A.S. Byatt, is an internationally renowned English author. She has been named by The Times as one of the 50 greatest British writers since 1945, has received a number of honorary fellowships and was awarded the title of 'Dame' in 1999. She grew up in York, and is the sister of novelist, Margaret Drabble. The two famously feud, though Byatt states their rivalry has been exaggerated by the newspapers.

Byatt's books combine realism with fantasy, and often portray the trials of human relationships. She says some of her characters represent her "greatest terror which is simple domesticity." She has several highly-acclaimed collections of short stories, and is a distinguished critic.

Book and writing awards

PEN/Macmillan Silver Pen Award 1986 (Still Life), Man Booker Prize 1990 (Possession: A Romance), Irish Time International Fiction Award 1990 (Possession: A Romance), Commonwealth Writers Prize (Possession: A Romance) and James Tait Black Memorial Prize (The Children's Book).

Similar authors to A.S. Byatt

Hilary MantelElizabeth Jane Howard and Margaret Drabble.

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Books by A. S. Byatt

Ragnarok
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Possession
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The Children's Book
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Medusa's Ankles
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Possession
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Angels And Insects
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Still Life
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The Matisse Stories
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Elementals
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The Virgin in the Garden
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Peacock and Vine
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Possession
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The Game
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The Shadow of the Sun
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Ragnarok
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Queen Hilary

Posted on 12th Sep, 2012

Our Fiction Buyer Chris White chooses Bring Up the Bodies, by Hilary Mantel as his Man Booker Prize winner. So many historical novels take the Tudor Age as their setting that it is sometimes hard to separate your Wyatts from your Churchyards. And yet with her previous novel, Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel easily managed to distinguish herself from her peers, displaying a vivid and immediate voice, an absorbingly comprehensive feel for the period and, above all, a central character, Thomas Cromwell, so chock full of contradictions that he makes Raskolnikov look one dimensional