Books you love: 8th July – 14th July

We have well over 100,000 reviews on Waterstones.com, and we value each and every one of them. So much so, that we have decided to reward the best review we receive each week.

Win a £10 Waterstones gift card

We will feature a small selection of the week’s best customer reviews on this page, and the writer of the best review (as judged by the .com team) will receive a £10 Waterstones gift card. So tell us about the book you love today, and a £10 gift card could be yours. Well, what are you waiting for…?

To submit a review simply click on the Write a review link next to the book of your choice.

What Milo Saw by Virginia MacGregor

 

What Milo Saw

 

by Virginia MacGregor

Five-star review

Reviewed by Cazla

Review Date: 13th July 2014

This was a really enjoyable book which I absolutely raced through. It engaged intelligently with a number of issues such as disability, how we treat the elderly, and immigration. Because of this I can see it being popular with book clubs. It was also just a delight to read, touching and humorous, and I would definitely recommend it. The book switches between the points of view of the four main characters which is great as they all see things slightly differently and that gives you a more rounded view of events. It also demonstrates how different people see things in different ways: especially with the relationship between Milo and his mother. Milo is by far the most readable point of view as he really is an engaging and lovely character. A fab debut which I hope many will read.

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Sad Men by Dave Roberts

Sad Men

by Dave Roberts

Five-star review

Reviewed by Anne Carter

Review Date: 11th July 2014

There is no doubt at all that advertising is big business. A multi-million pound industry, with eye-watering budgets for some brands. I’m guessing that the average person will not recognise many names in the business, although there can’t be many who haven’t heard of Saatchi and Saatchi – the world’s favourite advertising agency. I have absolutely loved Sad Men. Dave Roberts is a good guy; he’s sometimes made a few questionable decisions, but he’s honest and his writing is so easy to read. He has taken me on a pleasurable trip down memory lane, he’s had me singing jingles that I’ve not heard for years. He has evoked memories of carefree, happy childhood days and he has made me laugh on quite a few occasions. Despite the humour and the wealth of information about the advertising industry, there is an air of sadness and vulnerability in parts of his story, and it is his honesty about his disappointments and about where he thinks that he failed that made Sad Men such an enjoyable read for me.

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Stoner by John Williams

Stoner

by John Williams

Five-star review

Reviewed by XianMc

Review Date: 8th July 2014

I was intrigued by this one – a drugs book written by the composer of Star Wars? Of course, it’s neither, just a beautiful and very sad account of one lonely academic’s slow decline into obsolescence as the university that he serves for decades all but rejects him. It’s incredibly tense in places, features some superbly drawn characters and is a genuinely wonderful read.

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The Spy Who Loved by Clare Mulley

The Spy Who Loved

by Clare Mulley

Five-star review

Reviewed by Wieslaw K

Review Date: 11th July 2014

A wonderful, well documented story about Krystyna Skarbek, a Polish countess, who became a British agent as Christine Granville. Very moving , a real page turner, lots of interesting facts, reads very smoothly. This is a picture of a war time heroine and her extraordinary heroic exploits, but also a picture of a woman who loved life , men, and above all loved her country. This book is a must , but do not leave your meal on…the book will make you forget the world around you…

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What do you think?