Books you love: 30th June – 7th July

We have well over 100,000 reviews on Waterstones.com, and we value each and every one of them. So much so, that we have decided to reward the best review we receive each week.

Win a £10 Waterstones gift card

We will feature a small selection of the week’s best customer reviews on this page, and the writer of the best review (as judged by the .com team) will receive a £10 Waterstones gift card. So tell us about the book you love today, and a £10 gift card could be yours. Well, what are you waiting for…?

To submit a review simply click on the Write a review link next to the book of your choice.

The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson

The Girl Who
Saved the King
of Sweden

by Jonas Jonasson

Five-star review

Reviewed by cinderella

Review Date: 4th June 2014

As a huge fan of Jonas Jonasson’s first novel, The Hundred Year Old Man who Climbed out of the Window and Disappeared, I eagerly awaited his next book. I wondered though if it could match his thrilling debut. The good news is that Jonasson has done it again! He has assembled a cast of unlikely characters and come up with an equally improbable, but hugely enjoyable plot. He has also come up with a feisty heroine in Nombeko Mayeki. As wild and wacky as Jonasson’s first book, this laugh-out-loud novel will grab you from the very first page and keep you reading and chuckling all the way to the end.

Add to basket button
eBook button

Empress Dowager Cixi: The Concubine Who Launched Modern China by Jung Chang

Empress Dowager Cixi: The Concubine Who Launched Modern China

by Jung Chang

Five-star review

Reviewed by Emma I

Review Date: 4th June 2014

Having been a fan of reading about women who make their way in a man’s world ever since finding The Radium Woman in the school library at 10 years old, I devoured this biography which charts the political rise and fall of Cixi, whose achievements have almost been airbrushed out of history. Well-researched with evidence and sources acknowledged, like all good history it reads with the ease of a thumping good novel. Coming to Cixi’s story with little prior knowledge of Chinese history and culture, I have developed some understanding, and will now be able to put it into an historical perspective.

Add to basket button
eBook button

City of Heavenly Fire - Mortal Instruments Book 6 by Cassandra Clare

City of Heavenly Fire – Mortal Instruments Book 6

by Cassandra Clare

Five-star review

Reviewed by thenameisbex

Review Date: 3rd June 2014

As a great lover of the Shadowhunter world and Cassandra Clare’s writing, I was beyond excited to read the last installment to The Mortal Instruments even though I was incredibly sad it was ending. This book did not have a dull moment, and even when the characters were just having a conversation, it was amusing. I went through series of emotions and lost count how many times I cried! The characters are all interesting in their own way and the plot line is fantastic! I was VERY happy with how it ended. Waiting for the TDA series now!

Add to basket button

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit 451

by Ray Bradbury

Five-star review

Reviewed by Michael Barnes

Review Date: 30th June 2014

I stumbled upon the title Fahrenheit 451 on-line, with the author of the text claiming it to be a literary classic. I was sceptical, as I’d never heard of it. The characters are well-developed, interesting and the story is both mortifying and plausible in equal part, having already taken place to some degree or another in the modern day. Fahrenheit 451 is a deeply thought-provoking book and should be read by anyone with even a passing interest in it – even if you’re not sure, give it a try and you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

Add to basket button
eBook button

Blackbird by Tom Wright

Blackbird

by Tom Wright

Three-star review

Reviewed by CharlotteAntonietta

Review Date: 30th June 2014

An American crime mystery with a strong psychological theme running throughout. The themes throughout the book are typical to the genre with violence, sex and moral corruption being prevalent. This is balanced by Detective Bonham being the intelligent moral compass and devoted and loving father throughout. Using the detective, Wright also plays with the concept of justifiable violent reactions which was an interesting sideline. Kept me engaged until the climactic finale.

Add to basket button
eBook button

What do you think?